Why You Should Stop Blogging

why stop bloggingBy some estimates, the number of blogs out there has almost reached 200 million.

Even though the internet seems overrun by blogs, small business owners swear by blogging. As part of their marketing strategy, blogging tops other marketing tactics like newsletters and other forms of publishing in popularity.

According to researchers, B2B marketers who use blogs generate 67% more leads than non-bloggers.

And blogging is a natural fit for consultants. Many rely on it for lead generation, driving traffic to web sites, and to boost industry visibility. It’s simple to get a blog running and the costs for design and hosting are within reach for almost everyone.

What’s not to like?

Unfortunately, blogging doesn’t always live up to expectations for consultants.

Small firm consultants in particular struggle to balance the demands of a busy consulting practice with writing, publishing, and promoting their blogs. For them, blogging ends up a low-priority, or another we’ll-get-to-it-when-we-can activity.

When blogging becomes too time-consuming, it’s easy to end up with a “faux” blog–one that’s updated infrequently, lightly promoted, and has an inconsequential number of readers.

Unfortunately, blogging doesn’t always live up to expectations for consultants.

Under-performing blogs often become convenient repositories for stuff that doesn’t fit anywhere else, like press releases and announcements of upcoming events. When prospective clients visit these dormant blogs, they find little of value and navigate away–often forever.

When you come across a faux blog, it’s obvious that the owner is going through the motions but hasn’t yet taken the inevitable next step to put the blog out of its misery. In spite of lackluster results, consultants keep their blogs on life support.

I’m a big fan of blogging for consultants. But for some of you, it’s time to move on. [Continue reading]

Think You’re Too Busy to Market Your Business?

how to market your business when you're buy with client workThink Again.

If you’re like a lot of consultants, your plate is full. Very full.

You’ve got projects to run, a business to manage, and a personal life. Sometimes, there’s just not enough time in the day.

The natural reaction to the stress of being overloaded is to put off something on your to-do list. When you get too busy, you sort through your priorities and often it’s your marketing activities that you put on the back burner.

Why? Because it’s an easy thing to put on hold. You can convince yourself that publishing that article later than planned won’t hurt anything. Or you promise yourself that you will rework your web presence next month.

You can convince yourself that publishing that article later than planned won’t hurt anything.

If the reason you feel forced to pull back on marketing is because you have too much client work to do, that’s not a bad problem to have.

But the short-term gain from your client work, no matter how good it is, can put your business in a deep hole once that work slows up.

And that’s a problem you don’t want to have.

No doubt, you know it’s a mistake to let your marketing activities slip.

But to underscore the point, I’m going to use the business writer’s rule of social proof. When in doubt, roll out Peter Drucker.

Drucker summed up his take on marketing this way:

“Because the purpose of business is to create a customer, the business enterprise has two—and only two—basic functions: marketing and innovation.”

Even though you understand the long-term implications of setting aside your marketing program, you may feel that’s your only option. So you resolve to put your head down, get the client work done, and ramp up your marketing as soon as things settle down.

Even though you understand the long-term implications of setting aside your marketing program, you may feel that’s your only option.

Fortunately, you do have another choice.

[Continue reading]